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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 10:30pm EST
. > johnson & johnson and subsidiaries agreed to pay more than $2.2 million for marketing for uses that were never approved. eric holder talked about the justice t from the department. his briefing was 30 minutes. >> good morning, thank all for being here. associate by the attorney general and the for tant attorney general minute achusetts, car orti ortiz. the deputy inspector general for investigations at the department of health and human cantrell. gary we are here today to announce johnson and three to pay ries have agreed $2.2 million to resolve criminal marketed claims they prescription drugs for uses they and proved they were safe effective and paid kickbacks to pharmacies for prescribing and promoting these drugs. through the alleged actions, the pockets atined their the expense of american patients, and private insurance industry. everyonee up costs for and negatively impacted programs solvency of like medicare. involving the anti-psychotic drugs and the necricore and other products. addresses ent allegations of conduct that put at risk some of the most vocal society, inclu
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2013 1:30am EST
satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by ational captioning institute] >> join us next week for our look at first lady jacqueline kennedy with tv becoming central to american life, she was defined as never before by images, a young family entering the white house, international fame and the tragedy of a grieving widow all within three years. flew ept in spanish and french, she charmed world leaders, president kennedy referring to himself as the man who accompanied jacqueline kennedy to paris. . 00 eastern on c-span we are offering a special edition of the book "first ladies of the united states of america" presenting a portrait of each first lady and comments of noted historians on the roles of first ladies. t's available at $12.95 plus shipping. get your copy on c-span. more about the first ladies, including a special section "welcome to the white house," produced by the white house historical association and chronicles life of each of the first ladies. fires out more at c-span .orgslash firstladies. >> we bring public events directly to you, putting you in the room at congressiona
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 8:30pm EDT
working from bed because of poor health. join us for two hours as we explore the life and legacy of many eisenhower. eisenhower. we are offering a special edition of the book first ladies of the united states of america. a biography and a portrait of each first lady and comments from noted historians on the role of first ladies throughout history. it is available for the discounted price of $12.95 for shipping. plus shipping. and their website has more. it chronicles life in the executive mansion during the tenure of each of the first ladies. find out more at c-span.org/ firstladies >> c-span will bring public affairs events in front of you, putting you in the room at briefings and conferences and offer complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house as a --lic service of public cable tv. now you can watch us in hd. >> coming up next, a memorial service for the late tom foley, former speaker of the house. after that, tributes to other former members of congress who passed away recently. and jeb bush honored with the jack kemp foundation leadership award. >> this week, as is obama and
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 7:00pm EST
. [applause] we also have with us today some out of town guests. the secretary of the association of democratic chairs, my friend -- [applause] one of the greatest state chairs to ever hold that office, for and -- former maryland state chair jerry. [applause] let's give him a big round of applause. sitting next to the governor. very nice. [laughter] i have your governor. you -- i have my governor. you got mine. kim german. [applause] directorand executive jonathan hoosier. [applause] they want to come down and see what a real of them looks like, let's welcome jeremy kennedy. where is john? [applause] we also have main state representative matt moon in. joanna donovan. a let's give her a big round of applause. about 200 people got excited because i just ran -- right off the names of individual members of the house and they think i will read all of their names as well. no. [laughter] good all the members of the new hampshire house of representatives stand up and get a big welcome and round of applause echoes -- the applause? [applause] another round of applause. [applause] now, my hono
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 8:30pm EST
the russians were going to bomb us and that we had no way, and that ducking under a desk and turning your head away from the light was not going to work. teacher, can i go home, please? she said, goldie, you never go home for lunch. i said, i know, but my mom told me to. i walked to school everyday. of course, that is the way it was then. that is the way it was. that is when we used to lie on the grass and look up at the clouds and think about what they look like. our doorld never lock because everyone was welcome and we were never afraid. or we would sit on the stoop instead of burying ourselves into devices and figure out, what do you want to do. i don't know, what do you want to do. i don't know, let's crack open rocks. let's rake leaves and jump in them. i was a good sleeper, life was good. it was all wonderful. i can't called in from dinner, played until dark. until this happened. can ran home. i called my mother and i said, mom, we are all going to die. we are all going to die. my brain had in printed this horrible scenario, and it stayed high school. ended i cannot hear a sire
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2013 10:30pm EST
first ladies to go as the series continues. hope they'll read along with us and learn more about the interesting aspect on american history. a special thanks to our guest tonight. and to tim naphali for helping to tell her story. >> thank you very much. >> next week on our series, "first lady, betty ford." shortly after moving into the white house, she had a mastectomy. she released a statement detailing her illness. during her husband's re-election campaign in 1976, she feels so popular, the campaign slogan was vote for betty's husband. when the president lost, she delivered the concession speech. and after the white house, she publicly shared her experience with alcohol and prescription drug addiction leading to the creation of the betty ford center. next monday, the life and career of first lady betty ford, live at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span and c-span 3 as well as c-span radio. offering the special edition of the book, "first ladies of the united states of america." it has a biography and portrait of each first lady and comments from noted historians on the role of first ladies
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2013 10:00am EST
: influence and image" series. joining us this evening to talk about eleanor roosevelt is allida black, the editor of the eleanor roosevelt papers project at george washington university and an historian. another historian, doug brinkley who is an author from rice university. thank you for being here with us. doug brinkley, it's march 1933, inauguration and entered the white house. what are they walking into? >> fdr did not get to walk in. he came in a wheelchair. the fact that somebody was crippled in the lower half said there's nothing to fear but fear itself.. that's perhaps the most famous phrase of the inauguration. what people were fearing was unemployment, chaos, hooverville's, unemployment, agricultural angst. dust bowls, october 1929 crash of the stock market. our country was in tatters. and there is franklin roosevelt, this man has overcome such odds in his personal life, dealing with polio and now ushering in a new progressive era and offering 100 days of the new deal programs right off the bat where what people called the alphabet soup of the new deal, trying to get banks t
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 7:00pm EST
will join in tonight. you can tweet us at c-span's website. we are also taking questions on our facebook page. here are the phone numbers -- if you live in the eastern or central time zone, 202-585-3880. if you live in the mountain or pacific time zones, 202-585- 3881. we will mix your calls and questions throughout the program. where was she born and to whom? >> she was born in a town -- well, you can't really say a town because it was really not much of a town, either -- karnak, texas in december 1912 in a big house. one of the things i have found it in studying first ladies is how many married down into families lower them -- lower than them socially, economically, and sometimes, education. it made a big impression on me to drive past the house where the lady bird johnson was born. the big columns. it is near the louisiana border. you drive 300 miles west and you see that cabin where lyndon johnson was born. she came from a far wealthier background than she did. >> what is important to know about her childhood and what shaped her? >> i think the death of her mother. she was o
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 7:00pm EST
the language and the emotion that unites us. >> jacqueline kennedy's 1000 days as first lady was defined by images, young mother, advocate for the arts, fashion icon. footage of the assassination of president kennedy and his funeral cemented her in the public consciousness. welcome to the c-span series, first ladies, influence and image. we have two guests at the table, to tell you more about her story. he has a special focus on the cold war era and the kennedy administration. robert parry is a political scientist and as part of the modern first ladies series, he has written the jacqueline kennedy biography. before we get into more details about her white house years, i want to talk about the images of that assassination. anyone who was alive at that time has those images in their mind. this is a collective consciousness. she was just 34 years old. >> just 34 years old. we know so much about this story. he was shot and into her arms, for five minutes they were there and she felt that they left the hospital to go back to washington, but they had to do something to make sure that h
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2013 12:50am EST
question for janet. tell us about the future of journalism. >> oh, the small question. i think it is a very helpful message. we are it is clear that getting the domesticating that help people in the collective process of redefining what journalism is. that the posts of the scotus blog summarize -- there isng a contribution here in redefining what the storytelling is. it is redefining it in the moment and in multiple time frames. it is what you can do immediately that is adding to the pressure that we want more information immediately. it is who you conclude in the conversation. how heard other people say wonderful it was to hear the theanations during the weights and how welcoming the blog was to the new be people who are mystified by these arcane rituals. storyen there is a longer which is taking what is a petition, what is a document, what is the process, how do you follow one case? there is information organization process here that is a model. when people have forgotten the have --, it will forgotten the word blog, it will have contributed to make the necessary civil practice of as
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 10:00am EST
and my colleagues that wrote the forward. we both got pulled in. the other team wanted us to begin right away. they did not want us to be bystanders. "get involved right away." once they did that, it was like a jolt. to you have to act, you have be a doctor, a surgeon, a care provider. emotion to dismiss your and talk that away, what you are feeling -- tuck that away. you have one objective. you have to stop the bleeding. you have to get him back home to his family. >> he uses his own military experience is to write about physicians working in afghanistan. more on sunday night at 8:00 on "q&a." >> florence harding once said she had only one real hobby. warren harding. she was a significant force in her husband's presidency. florence harding set many precedents that would help define the role of the modern first lady. good evening. tonight we are going to tell you the story of florence harding, who has been neglected and derided throughout history. --inrtime, the hardings her time, the hardings came in as popular people. we are going to learn about her and her husband's time in offi
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2013 12:00am EST
television age. the white house decided how the presidential family would be use or not. i hope we get into this a little more. pat nixon did not have the opportunity to control as much as she would have liked. the way in which she was presented to the american people. >> was this precedence setting? the first white house to go to this extreme with the media? >> no. the kennedy white house had thought a lot about jackie. the very fact that jaclyn kenny went to dallas, she was going to dallas because the president knew he needed her help in what was supposed to just the apolitical tour. this was not the first time. jaclyn kenny -- kennedy was the first. eleanor roosevelt thought about her public role, but she pushed that. she is unilaterally responsible for that. the roosevelt white house pushing her in front. i think jackie kennedy was the first lady that is part of a media strategy. pat nixon did not play the role, the public role, that the white house wanted her to play. >> i think it goes further back. i think the republican party used her during the eisenhower, when she was second
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 10:00am EST
thanksgiving. thank you for joining us. coming up next, a look at the life of mamie eisenhower. and then a bust is dedicated to winston churchill. then nbc new coverage of the state funeral for resident john f. kennedy. >> the 1960's were different. [laughter] there were a lot of things happening involving race, the breakdown, the structure of society. i was suddenly out of the seminary and in new england. there were no rules. things were falling apart without structure. i was fortunate to be at holy cross. i was fortunate with the structure that the nuns had given me. i was fortunate. i had been in predominantly white schools. i was the only black kid in my high school and savannah. the transition to a school with very few blacks in a difficult set of circumstances, i had a jumpstart. i was ahead of the game. i had something. it allowed me to continue to do well, even though it was difficult. >> later today, here from two supreme court justices. clarence thomasson 9:00 p.m., followed by elena kagan at 9:45 p.m. c- days of book tv on span2. on c-span3, the 150th anniversary of the g
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2013 7:00pm EST
whole effort to bring a natural world and the man-made world into harmony. to bring usefulness, delight to our entire environment. that only begins with flowers and trees and landscaping. >> that is from a film created by the johnson administration with lady bird johnson talking about beautification, her signature issue. she was a natural campaigner, a successful businesswoman, and a savvy political partner to her husband, our 36th president, lyndon baines johnson. good evening and welcome to c- span's "first ladies." we will tell you the story of claudia taylor johnson, known to everyone as lady bird, wife of the 36th president. here to tell our story tonight are two guests, cokie roberts, political commentator for abc news and npr. she's also the author of two books about women's political history. eddie lloyd caroli is a first lady's expert. she is the author of numerous books. she is currently working on a new biography of lady bird johnson. ladies, i want to start with the beginning, where we were 50 years ago this week. this is an administration birthed in national tragedy. over t
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 1:00am EST
confused. we are meeting at the radical bookstore and wondering why the fbi was looking at us. [laughter] you meet at a store with a little red book behind you. other people might be interested in what you're doing. and they are not all called nsa. [laughter] but at any rate, i was accepted, to my surprise. and i went to cambridge and i remember that there were a lot of people in the law school and it was very confusing. i escaped from that madness. it was sort of like the scene that you see in "the stranger." having this weird experience out there. that is what happened to me at harvard. i became like breathless, a panic attack. i got back to holy cross and said, there is no way i can go there. it is big and all these people are walking around dressed up like they were going into the corporate world. back then, we were anti- corporations. i decided to go to penn. i had not been accepted at yale. i was going to go to penn law school. yale sent me, you knew you were accepted if they sent you a big packet of materials. yale sent me the thinnest of letters. we are not into the catalog thing
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2013 8:55pm EST
brought us to this town and that kept me here for almost four decades. it is important to reflect and look back and see what has been done because there is no better way to judge a future than by the past. but the important thing that faces our country now is for a new president to look at the new challenges and find new answers, find a means of communicating with our young and providing leadership and inspiration for them so that they will realize that we do care. find a way to help better understanding come to our races so that we can live together in peace and harmony and equality with justice to all. no president ever came to this office on a platform of doing what was wrong. most of us have made some decisions definitely wrong, and as we leave office most of the people seemed to feel that most of the things we have done have been wrong. but every man who is ever occupied this office or set at this desk or reclined in his chair has been dedicated to doing what he believes was for the best interests of the people of this country. i'm utterly convinced that when any man takes th
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)